Saving Time and Money for Rockwell Automation

Problem: As it looked to improve product functionality, Rockwell Automation relied on developing physical prototypes to test heat sink design for its powerful microprocessor chips. This approach left mechanical engineers scrambling at the end of the design cycle to find an electronics cooling solution that would fit the prototypes.

 

Solution: Rockwell leveraged AltaSim’s extensive simulation expertise to quickly deliver accurate simulations through increasingly complex models for a wide range of product design calculations.

 

Result: These simulations enabled Rockwell to test electronics cooling solutions prior to the costly development of the first physical prototypes. This approach reduced Rockwell’s reliance on physical prototyping, driving down both the length and cost of the design cycle.

Electronics Cooling Results

Air flow and temperature inside Electronics Cabinet

Solver Speed-up for Conjugate Heat Transfer with Radiation

COMSOL Multiphysics® can solve conjugate heat transfer problems that include conduction, convection and radiation.  Both Surface-to-Ambiant and Surface-to-Surface radiation formulations are available.  Follow this link June 2019 COMSOL Electronics Cooling Webinar for our recent Webinar that includes a step by step demonstration of implementation in COMSOL Multiphysics®.

When using Surface-to-Surface radiation, we strongly recommend that the radiation variables are located within their own separate Segregated Sub-Step (see step-by-step set-up below).  This simple change can have a significant effect on simulation time.  For example, we recently observed a reduction in the time for a solution, from 12 hours to 2 hours.

Video of step-by-step instructions:

Written step-by-step instructions:
Right-click on Segregated 1 and select ‘Segregated Step’.

Right-click on Segregated Step 3 and select ‘Move up’ to move it above the Lower Limit feature.

Click on Nonisothermal flow u, p, T and in the settings window hold Ctrl and click on the two Inward heat flux variables.  Then, click the ‘Delete’ icon to remove them from this step

Click on Segregated Step 3 and in the settings window click the ‘+ (plus)’icon.  Hold Ctrl and select both inward heat flux variables to add them to the list.  Finally, change the linear solver to Algebraic Multigrid ht (htrad1) to use the iterative linear system solver set-up recommended for radiation variables. 

 

You have now moved the radiation variables into a separate segregated sub-step.

How did this change affect your run time?  We would enjoy hearing about the impact of this change on your analyses.

To read more about Electronics Cooling, check out these AltaSim blog posts:

HeatSinkSim – Changing Electronics Cooling

Heat Sink Design

Approaches to Thermal Mitigation

Improved Thermal Analysis for Electronics Cooling

Solver Speed-up for Conjugate Heat Transfer with Radiation

COMSOL Multiphysics® can solve conjugate heat transfer problems that include conduction, convection and radiation.  Both Surface-to-Ambiant and Surface-to-Surface radiation formulations are available.  Follow this link June 2019 COMSOL Electronics Cooling Webinar for our recent Webinar that includes a step by step demonstration of implementation in COMSOL Multiphysics®.
 
When using Surface-to-Surface radiation, we strongly recommend that the radiation variables are located within their own separate Segregated Sub-Step (see step-by-step set-up below).  This simple change can have a significant effect on simulation time.  For example, we recently observed a reduction in the time for a solution, from 12 hours to 2 hours.

Video of step-by-step instructions:

Written step-by-step instructions:
Right-click on Segregated 1 and select ‘Segregated Step’.

Right-click on Segregated Step 3 and select ‘Move up’ to move it above the Lower Limit feature.

Click on Nonisothermal flow u, p, T and in the settings window hold Ctrl and click on the two Inward heat flux variables.  Then, click the ‘Delete’ icon to remove them from this step

Click on Segregated Step 3 and in the settings window click the ‘+ (plus)’icon.  Hold Ctrl and select both inward heat flux variables to add them to the list.  Finally, change the linear solver to Algebraic Multigrid ht (htrad1) to use the iterative linear system solver set-up recommended for radiation variables. 

 

You have now moved the radiation variables into a separate segregated sub-step.
 
How did this change affect your run time?  We would enjoy hearing about the impact of this change on your analyses.
 
To read more about Electronics Cooling, check out these AltaSim blog posts:
 
HeatSinkSim – Changing Electronics Cooling

Heat Sink Design

Approaches to Thermal Mitigation

Improved Thermal Analysis for Electronics Cooling

Free Webinar: Simulating Thermal Management in Structures

Engineers spend extensive time developing thermal management solutions for structures subjected to high or low temperatures. These challenges continue to grow as more complex structures and temperature distributions are required for nominal operations. In many cases, operational changes during the life of the structure have unintended and damaging consequences that require engineers to develop unique solutions to the damage that develops.

 

Standard heat transfer mechanisms like convection, conduction, and radiation need to be considered in determining the thermomechanical load on a structure. Accurate representation of convective heat transfer may require a fluid dynamics solution, and internal heat generation may be a primary heat source.

Temperature distribution in an aluminum plate during a friction stir welding process

In this presentation, AltaSim’s Kyle Koppenhoefer will discuss the development of a model structure subjected to a complex thermal environment. The webinar will also include a live demo in the COMSOL Multiphysics® software and a Q&A session.

 

Date:  Thursday, April 18, 2019
Time:  2:00pm EDT
Duration: 1 hour

 

 

 

COMSOL Tips & Tricks v5.3: Model Methods Feature

New to version 5.3: Model Method Feature
 

To help save time and make analysis more streamlined it is common for us to set up physics with parameterized inputs. Unfortunately, this approach can also mean repeating commands multiple times that can be time consuming and may introduce mistakes. Now you can reduce the time that this process takes and ensure uniformity of implementation by using the Model Methods available in COMSOL Multiphysics® version 5.3. Model Methods allow recording and executing strings of commands, similar to a macro which you can then edit or create custom commands to add functionality to your Modeling.
 
Creating Model Methods in COMSOL is easy. When you click the “Record Code” button, the software records your commands and turns them into JavaScript. Quick Tip: be sure to change the Method type from “Application Method” to “Model Method” if you plan to run the code in the Model Builder window.  You can view, edit, and record additional code in the Application Builder window. You do not need to know Java to build or use Model Methods, but a little bit of programming basics can go a long way if you are interested in further developing robust and/or complex Methods.
 
Example:
 
Here’s a simple method we developed to create a heat transfer node with initialized temperature and convection coefficients, all in a few clicks. Check it out!
 
Step 1) Start a new method
 
Under the Task Ribbon, click "Developer>Record Method". Change the Method type from "Application method" to "Model method". A red box appears around the edge of the model window to indicate code is recording.
 

 

Step 2) Create Default Parameters
 
Add a heat transfer physics node and create the following default parameters the same way you normally would. You can view code created at any time by going to the Application Builder Window.
 


 
Step 3) Assign Parameter Values to Physics
 
Under Heat Transfer, create a heat flux node and change the type to “Convective heat flux.” Enter the parameters into the fields as shown. The following code is automatically generated. Click "Stop Recording".
 


Step 4) Run Model Method
 
Copy your code into any new or existing model file and click “Run Model Method.” The physics setup is automatically generated.
 

 

Time Saving Summary
  Manual Method Model Method
Number of Entries 10 0
Number of Clicks 18 1
Total Time 90 seconds 1.5 seconds

 

And there you have it. Repetitive processes that once took up valuable time and introduced possible errors can now be accomplished quickly and easily. We hope this tip is helpful, and as always, we are here to address your modeling needs through our consulting services and/or training.
 
Happy COMSOLing!

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